Subscribe
About Dairy Wellness

Zoetis Launches DRAXXIN 25 to Treat Small Calves for BRD
Posted by Greg Edwards

Zoetis today announced the launch of DRAXXIN® 25 (tulathromycin injection) Injectable Solution, a lower concentration of DRAXXIN® (tulathromycin) Injectable Solution, to treat bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in suckling, dairy and veal calves.

Just like the current concentration of DRAXXIN, DRAXXIN 25 offers broad-spectrum coverage against the major causes of BRD, including Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, Histophilus somni and Mycoplasma bovis. However, producers and veterinarians should note that DRAXXIN 25 has a pre-slaughter withdrawal time of 22 days, compared with the 18-day pre-slaughter time for DRAXXIN.

“The efficacy of DRAXXIN has made it a leading choice by veterinarians and producers for the treatment of BRD in larger, ruminating calves,” said Dr. Robert Lynch, senior veterinarian, Dairy Technical Services, Zoetis. “The new formulation of DRAXXIN 25 allows for more-accurate and convenient dosing for smaller calves. Producers and veterinarians can be confident they are administering the correct treatment needed.”

 

PRODUCT

INDICATIONS

APPROVED DOSAGE

LABELED TREATMENT/ ROUTE OF ADMINISTRATION

PRE-SLAUGHTER WITHDRAWAL

DRAXXIN® 25

Treatment of BRD

1 mL/22 lb.

(Do not administer more than 11.5 mL

per injection site.)

Single dose,

subcutaneous

22 days

DRAXXIN

Treatment and control of BRD, treatment of pinkeye

1.1 mL/100 lb.

(Do not administer more than 10 mL per injection site.)

Single dose,

subcutaneous

18 days

 

DRX-00029

All trademarks are the property of Zoetis Inc., its affiliates and/or its licensors. All other trademarks are the property of their repsctive owners. ©2019 Zoetis Inc. all rights reserved. The product information provided in this site is intended only for residents of the United States. The products discussed herein may have different label indications in different countries. The animal health information contained herein is provided for educational purposes only and is not intended to replace consultation with your veterinarian. All decisions regarding animal health care must be made with a veterinarian, considering the unique characteristics of each animal.